Recombinant DNA

Definition of Recombinant DNA Molecules ( According to NIH Guidelines)

Recombinant DNA molecules are defined as either: (i) molecules that are constructed outside living cells by joining natural or synthetic DNA segments to DNA molecules that can replicate in a living cell, or (ii) molecules that result from the replication of those described in (i) above.

 Synthetic DNA segments which are likely to yield a potentially harmful polynucleotide or polypeptide (e.g., a toxin or a pharmacologically active agent) are considered as equivalent to their natural DNA counterpart. If the synthetic DNA segment is not expressed in vivo as a biologically active polynucleotide or polypeptide product, it is exempt from the NIH Guidelines.

 Genomic DNA of plants and bacteria that have acquired a transposable element, even if the latter was donated from a recombinant vector no longer present, are not subject to the NIH Guidelines unless the transposon itself contains recombinant DNA.

All activities involving recombinant DNA  (r-DNA) must be registered with and approve by the Institutional Biosafety Committee. For details of registration/approval process please check UNTHSC Biosafety Manual Section X.  Please use UNTHSC rDNA Safety Plan for registration of the projects involving r -DNA.  All projects involving recombinant DNA techniques conducted at or sponsored by an institution that receives NIH funds for projects involving such techniques must comply with the NIH Guidelines.  Noncompliance may result in:  (i) suspension, limitation, or termination of NIH funds for all recombinant DNA research at the institution, or (ii) a requirement for prior NIH approval of any or all recombinant DNA projects at the institution.

NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules

Recombinant DNA and Gene Transfer FAQs from the Office of Biotechnology Activities

UNTHSC rDNA excempt1.doc

This page last updated 24th Apr 2013